pressure ulcers

prevention is better than cure.

pressure ulcers

prevention is better than cure.

pressure ulcers

prevention is better than cure.

Educating Our Carers

Posted by clairejames on February 2, 2017

I’m not a qualified nurse or a person who spends their time assessing the quality of care provided in our residential care homes, nursing homes and hospitals.  I do, however, spend an awful lot of time with those people who deliver the care to our most frail, elderly and needy population.  I’m talking about our carers, both professional carers and those who do it for their own families.

I for one, would like to stay independent and living in my own home as long as is physically possible but I accept that there may come a time when I will need help to do some of the more difficult jobs around the house and my family may not be close enough to help me.  When I turn to a professional care company I should be able to guarantee the level of service that I will receive and I should rightly expect the people coming into my home know all of the important things that could help to protect me from avoidable harm.

And yet, here I am, as a director of Your Turn, spending the majority of my days providing simple knowledge and advice to carers around the UK on how to prevent pressure ulcers – a harm that is more often than not entirely avoidable.  I am astounded that a professional carer is not required to know the basics of care that make up the keys to prevention – check the skin, keep a person mobile, deal with incontinence and ensure that people are eating and drinking well.

Is it not time for organisations such as CQC to start requiring ALL carers, not just our nursing staff, to have the basic knowledge that could protect someone from developing a potentially life ending wound?  If you have ever seen a pressure ulcer or cared for someone who has one then you will understand my absolute amazement that somebody can be allowed to care for a person whose risk of developing a pressure ulcer is incredibly high without any knowledge of what one is, how it starts or what it looks like.

We need to make being a carer a professional job with qualifications that match their status – they are incredibly important people and we should educate them to ensure that they have all the necessary weapons in their armoury to help protect our loved ones.

If you care about our ageing population or any individuals within it, ask yourself this, do you know how to prevent pressure ulcers and if you do, have you told those people that you care about what you know?  Knowledge is most definitely power when it comes to preventing pressure ulcers and is something that we should all take very seriously indeed.

 

Claire James

Director of Your Turn

 

The views expressed in this article are entirely those of the author.